Preventing SQL Injections in Java With JPA and Hibernate

published also on DZone 09.2022

published also on DZone 09.2022

When we have a look at OWASP’s top 10 vulnerabilities [1], SQL Injections are still in a popular position. In this short article, we discuss several options on how SQL Injections could be avoided.

When Applications have to deal with databases existing always high-security concerns, if an invader got the possibility to hijack the database layer of your application, he can choose between several options. Stolen the data of the stored users to flood them with spam is not the worst scenario that could happen. Even more problematic would be when stored payment information got abused. Another possibility of an SQL Injection Cyber attack is to get illegal access to restricted pay content and/or services. As we can see, there are many reasons why to care about (Web) Application security.

To find well-working preventions against SQL Injections, we need first to understand how an SQL Injection attack works and on which points we need to pay attention. In short: every user interaction that processes the input unfiltered in an SQL query is a possible target for an attack. The data input can be manipulated in a manner that the submitted SQL query contains a different logic than the original. Listing 1 will give you a good idea about what could be possible.

SELECT Username, Password, Role FROM User
   WHERE Username = 'John Doe' AND Password = 'S3cr3t';
SELECT Username, Password, Role FROM Users
   WHERE Username = 'John Doe'; --' AND Password='S3cr3t';

Listing 1: Simple SQL Injection

The first statement in Listing 1 shows the original query. If the Input for the variables Username and Password is not filtered, we have a lack of security. The second query injects for the variable Username a String with the username John Doe and extends with the characters ‘; –. This statement bypasses the AND branch and gives, in this case, access to the login. The ‘; sequence close the WHERE statement and with — all following characters got un-commented. Theoretically, it is possible to execute between both character sequences every valid SQL code.

Of course, my plan is not to spread around ideas that SQL commands could rise up the worst consequences for the victim. With this simple example, I assume the message is clear. We need to protect each UI input variable in our application against user manipulation. Even if they are not used directly for database queries. To detect those variables, it is always a good idea to validate all existing input forms. But modern applications have mostly more than just a few input forms. For this reason, I also mention keeping an eye on your REST endpoints. Often their parameters are also connected with SQL queries.

For this reason, Input validation, in general, should be part of the security concept. Annotations from the Bean Validation [2] specification are, for this purpose, very powerful. For example, @NotNull, as an Annotation for the data field in the domain object, ensure that the object only is able to persist if the variable is not empty. To use the Bean Validation Annotations in your Java project, you just need to include a small library.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.hibernate.validator</groupId>
    <artifactId>hibernate-validator</artifactId>
    <version>${version}</version>
</dependency>

Listing 2: Maven Dependency for Bean Validation

Perhaps it could be necessary to validate more complex data structures. With Regular Expressions, you have another powerful tool in your hands. But be careful. It is not that easy to write correct working RegEx. Let’s have a look at a short example.

public static final String RGB_COLOR = "#[0-9a-fA-F]{3,3}([0-9a-fA-F]{3,3})?";

public boolean validate(String content, String regEx) {
    boolean test;
    if (content.matches(regEx)) {
        test = true;
    } else {
        test = false;
    }
    return test;
}

validate('#000', RGB_COLOR);

Listing 3: Validation by Regular Expression in Java

The RegEx to detect the correct RGB color schema is quite simple. Valid inputs are #ffF or #000000. The Range for the characters is 0-9, and the Letters A to F. Case insensitive. When you develop your own RegEx, you always need to check very well existing boundaries. A good example is also the 24 hours time format. Typical mistakes are invalid entries like 23:60 or 24:00. The validate method compares the input string with the RegEx. If the pattern matches the input, the method will return true. If you want to get more ideas about validators in Java, you can also check my GitHub repository [3].

In resume, our first idea to secure user input against abuse is to filter out all problematic character sequences, like — and so on. Well, this intention of creating a blocking list is not that bad. But still have some limitations. At first, the complexity of the application increased because blocking single characters like –; and ‘ could causes sometimes unwanted side effects. Also, an application-wide default limitation of the characters could cost sometimes problems. Imagine there is a text area for a Blog system or something equal.

This means we need another powerful concept to filter the input in a manner our SQL query can not manipulate. To reach this goal, the SQL standard has a very great solution we can use. SQL Parameters are variables inside an SQL query that will be interpreted as content and not as a statement. This allows large texts to block some dangerous characters. Let’s have a look at how this will work on a PostgreSQL [4] database.

DECLARE user String;
SELECT * FROM login WHERE name = user;

Listing 4: Defining Parameters in PostgreSQL

In the case you are using the OR mapper Hibernate, there exists a more elegant way with the Java Persistence API (JPA).

String myUserInput;

@PersistenceContext
public EntityManager mainEntityManagerFactory;

CriteriaBuilder builder =
    mainEntityManagerFactory.getCriteriaBuilder();

CriteriaQuery<DomainObject> query =
    builder.createQuery(DomainObject.class);

// create Criteria
Root<ConfigurationDO> root =
    query.from(DomainObject.class);

//Criteria SQL Parameters
ParameterExpression<String> paramKey =
    builder.parameter(String.class);

query.where(builder.equal(root.get("name"), paramKey);

// wire queries together with parameters
TypedQuery<ConfigurationDO> result =
    mainEntityManagerFactory.createQuery(query);

result.setParameter(paramKey, myUserInput);
DomainObject entry = result.getSingleResult();

Listing 5: Hibernate JPA SQL Parameter Usage

Listing 5 is shown as a full example of Hibernate using JPA with the criteria API. The variable for the user input is declared in the first line. The comments in the listing explain the way how it works. As you can see, this is no rocket science. The solution has some other nice benefits besides improving web application security. At first, no plain SQL is used. This ensures that each database management system supported by Hibernate can be secured by this code.

May the usage looks a bit more complex than a simple query, but the benefit for your application is enormous. On the other hand, of course, there are some extra lines of code. But they are not that difficult to understand.

Resources

[1] https://owasp.org
[2] https://beanvalidation.org
[3] https://github.com/ElmarDott/TP-CORE/blob/master/src/main/java/org/europa/together/utils/Validator.java
[4] https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/plpgsql-declarations.html
[5] https://hibernate.org
[6] Seminar: Web-Application Security

Working with textfiles on the Linux shell

Linux turns more and more to a popular operating system for IT professional. One of the reasons for this movement are the server solutions. Stability and low resource consuming are some of the important characteristics for this choice. May you already played around with a Microsoft Server you will miss the graphical Desktop in a Linux Server. After a login into a Linux Server you just see the command prompt is waiting for your inputs.

In this short article I introduce you some helpful Linux programs to work with files on the command line. This allows you to gather information, for example from log files. Before I start I’d like to recommend you a simple and powerful editor named joe.

Ctrl + C – Abort the current editing of a file without saving changes
Ctrl + KX – Exit the current editing and save the file
Ctrl + KF – Find text in the current file
Ctrl + V – Paste clipboard into document (CMD + V for Mac)
Ctrl + Y – Delete current line where cursor is

To install joe on an Debian based Linux distribution you just need to type:

sudo apt-get install joe

1. When you need to find content in a huge text file GREP will be your best friend. GREP allows you to search for text pattern in files.

$ gerp <pattern> file.log
    -n : number of lines that matches
    -i : case insensitive
    -v : invert matches
    -E : extended regex
    -c : count number of matches
    -l : find filenames that matches the pattern

2. When you need to analyze network packages NGREP is the tool of your choice.

$ ngrep -I file.pcap
    -d : specify the network interface
    -i : case insensitive
    -x : print in alternate hexdump
    -t : print timestamp
    -I : read a pcap file

3. When you need to see the changes between two versions of a file, DIFF will do the job.

$ diff version1.txt version2.txt
    -a : add
    -c : change
    -d : delete
     # : line numbers
     < : file 1
     > : file 2

4. Sometimes it is necessary to give an order to the entries in a file. SORT is gonna to help you with this task.

$ sort file.log 
     -o : write the result to a file
     -r : reverse order
     -n : numerical sort
     -k : sort by column
     -c : check if orderd
     -u : sort and remove
     -f : ignore case
     -h : human sort

5. If you have to replace Strings inside of a huge text, like find and replace you can do that with SED, the stream editor.

$ sed s/regex/replace/g
     -s : search
     -g : replace
     -d : delete
     -w : append to file
     -e : execute command
     -n : suppress output

6. Parsing fields using delimiters in text files can done by using CUT.

 $ cut -d ":" -f 2 file.log
     -d : use the field delimiter
     -f : field numbers
     -c : specific characters position

7. The extraction of substrings who occurred just once in a text file you will reach with UNIQ.

$ uniq file.txt
     -c : count the numbers of duplicates
     -d : print duplicates
     -i : case insesitive

8.  AWK is a programming language consider to manipulate data.

$ awk {print $2} file.log

A briefly overview to Java frameworks

When you have a look at Merriam Webster about the word framework you find the following explanations:

  • a basic conceptional structure
  • a skeletal, openwork, or structural frame

May you could think that libraries and frameworks are equal things. But this is not correct. The source code calls the functionality of a library directly. When you use a framework it is exactly the opposite. The framework calls specific functions of your business logic. This concept is also know as Inversion of Control (IoC).

For web applications we can distinguish between Client-Side and Server-Side frameworks. The difference is that the client usually run in a web browser, that means to available programming languages are limited to JavaScript. Depending on the web server we are able to chose between different programming languages. the most popular languages for the internet are PHP and Java. All web languages have one thing in common. They produce as output HTML, witch can displayed in a web browser.

In this article I created an short overview of the most common Java frameworks which also could be used in desktop applications. If you wish to have a fast introduction for Java Server Application you can check out my Article about Java EE and Jakarta.

If you plan to use one or some of the discussed frameworks in your Java application, you just need to include them as Maven or Gradle dependency.

Before I continue I wish to telly you, that this frameworks are made to help you in your daily business as developer to solve problems. Every problem have multiple solutions. For this reason it is more important to learn the concepts behind the frameworks instead just how to use a special framework. During the last two decades since I’m programming I saw the rise and fall of plenty Frameworks. Examples of frameworks today almost nobody remember are: Google Web Toolkit and JBoss Seam.

The most used framework in Java for writing and executing unit tests is JUnit. An also often used alternative to JUnit is TestNG. Both solutions working quite equal. The basic idea is execute a function by defined parameters and compare the output with an expected results. When the output fit with the expectation the test passed successful. JUnit and TestNG supporting the Test Driven Development (TDD) paradigm.

If you need to emulate in your test case a behavior of an external system you do not have in the moment your tests are running, then Mockito is your best friend. Mockito works perfectly together with JUnit and TestNG.

The Behavioral Driven Development (BDD) is an evolution to unit tests where you are able to define the circumstances the customer will accepted the integrated functionality. The category of BDD integration tests are called acceptance tests. Integration tests are not a replacement for unit tests, they are an extension to them. The frameworks JGiven and Cucumber are also very similar both are like Mockito an extension for the unit test frameworks JUnit and TestNG.

For dealing in Java with relational databases we can choose between several persistence frameworks. Those frameworks allow you to define your database structure in Java objects without writing any line of SQL The mapping between Java objects and database tables happens in the background. Another very great benefit of using O/R Mapper like Hibernate, iBatis and eclipse link is the possibility to replace the underlying database sever. But this achievement is not so easy to reach as it in the beginning seems.

In the next section I introduce a technique was first introduced by the Spring Framework. Dependency Injection (DI). This allows the loose coupling between modules and an more easy replacement of components without a new compile. The solution from Google for DI is called Guice and Java Enterprise binges its own standard named CDI.

Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) are another category for frameworks. It depends on the chosen technology like JavaFX or JSF which framework is useful. The most of the provided controls are equal. Common libraries for GUI JSF components are PrimeFaces, BootsFaces or ButterFaces. OmniFaces is a framework to have standardized solution for JSF problems, like chaching and so on. Collections for JavaFX controls you can find in ControlsFX and BootstrapFX.

If you have to deal with Event Stream Processing (ESP) may you should have a look on Hazelcast or Apache Kafka. ESP means that the system will react on constantly generated data. The event is a reference to each data point which can be persisted in a database and the stream represent to output of the events.

In December a often used technology comes out of the shadow, because of a attacking vulnerability in Log4J. Log4J together with the Simple Logging Facade for Java (SLF4J) is one of the most used dependencies in the software industry. So you can imagine how critical was this information. Now you can imagine which important role Logging has for software development. Another logging framework is Logback, which I use.

Another very helpful dependency for professional software development is FF4J. This allows you to define feature toggles, also know as feature flags to enable and disable functionality of a software program by configuration.

Name Category
JUnit, TestNG TDD – unit testing
Mockito TDD mocking objects
JGiven, Cucumber BDD – acceptance testing
Hibernate, iBatis, Eclipse Link JPA- O/R Mapper
Spring Framework, Google Guice Dependency Injection
PrimeFaces, BootsFaces, ButterFaces JSF User Interfaces
ControlsFX, BootstrapFX JavaFX User Interfaces
Hazelcast, Apache Kafka Event Stream Processing
SLF4J, Logback, Log4J Logging
FF4j Feature Flags

This list could be much longer. I just tried to focus on the most used ones the are for Java programmers relevant. Feel free to leave a comment to suggest something I may forgot. If you share this article on several social media platforms with your friends or colleagues I will appreciate.

How to reduce the size of a PDF document

 When you own a big collection of PDF files the used storage space can increasing quite high. Sometimes I own PDF documents with more than 100 MB. Well nowadays this storage capacities are not a big issue. But if you want to backup those files to other mediums like USB pen drives or a DVD it would be great to reduce the file size of you PDF collection.

Long a go I worked with a little scrip that allowed me to reduce the file size of a PDF document significantly. This script called a interactive tool called PDF Sam with some command line parameters. Unfortunately many years ago the software PDF Sam become with this option commercial, so I was needed a new solution.

Before I go closer to my approach I will discuss some basic information about what happens in the background. As first, when your PDF blew up to a huge file is the reason because of the included graphics. If you scanned you handwritten notes to save them in one single archive you should be aware that every scan is a image file. By default the PDF processor already optimize those files. This is why the file size almost don’t get reduced when you try to compress them by a tool like zip.

Scanned images can optimized before to include them to a PDF document by a graphic tool like Gimp. Actions you can perform are reduce the image quality and increase the contrast. Specially for scanned handwritten notes are this steps important. If the contrast is very low and maybe you plan to print those documents, it could happens they are not readable. Another problem in this case is that you can’t apply a text search over the document. A solution to this problem is the usage of an OCR tool to transform text in images back to real text.

We resume shortly the previous minds. When we try to reduce the file size of a PDF we need to reduce the quality of the included images. This can be done by reducing the amount of dots per inch (dpi). Be aware that after the compression the image is still readable. As long you do not plan to do a high quality print like a magazine or a book, nothing will get affected.

When we wanna reduce plenty PDF files in a short time we can’t do all those actions by hand. For instance we need an automated solution. To reach the goal it is important that the tool we use support the command line. The we can create a simple batch job to perform the task without any hands on.

We have several options to optimize the images inside a PDF. If it is a great idea to perform all options, depend on the purpose of the usage.

  1. change the image file to the PNG format
  2. reduce the graphic dimensions to the real printable area
  3. reduce the DPI
  4. change the image color profile to gray-scale

As Ubuntu Linux user I have all of the things I need already together. And now comes the part that I explain you my well working solution.

Ghostscript

GPL Ghostscript is used for PostScript/PDF preview and printing. Usually as a back-end to a program such as ghostview, it can display PostScript and PDF documents in an X11 environment.

If you don’t have Ghostscript installed on you system, you can do this very fast.

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get -y install ghostscript

 Before you execute any script or command be aware you do not overwrite with the output the existing files. In the case something get wrong you loose all originals to try other options. Before you start to try out anything backup your files or generate the compressed PDF in a separate folder.

gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
   -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
   -dPDFSETTINGS=/default \
   -dNOPAUSE -dQUIET -dBATCH -dDetectDuplicateImages \
   -dCompressFonts=true \
   -r150 \
   -sOutputFile=output.pdf input.pdf

The important parameter is r150, which reduce the output resolution to 150 dpi. In the manage you can check for more parameters to compress the result more stronger. The given command you are able to place in a script, were its surrounded by a FOR loop to fetch all PDF files in a directory, to write them reduced in another directory.

The command I used for a original file with 260 MB and 640 pages. After the operation was done the size got reduced to around 36 MB. The shrunken file is almost 7 times smaller than the original. A huge different. As you can see in the screenshot, the quality of the pictures is almost identical.

As alternative, in the case you won’t come closer to the command line there is a online PDF compression tool in German and English language for free use available.

PDF Workbench

Linux Systems have many powerful tools to deal with PDF documents. For example the Libreoffice Suite have a button where you can generate for every document a proper PDF file. But sometimes you wish to create a PDF in the printing dialog of any other application in your system. With the cups PDF print driver you enable this functionality on your system.

sudo apt-get install printer-driver-cups-pdf

As I already explained, OCR allows you to extract from graphics text to make a document searchable. When you need to work with this type of software be aware that the result is good, but you cant avoid mistakes. Even when you perform an OCR on a scanned book page, you will find several mistakes. OCRFeeder is a free and very powerful solution for Linux systems.

Another powerful helper is the tool PDF Arranger which allows you to add or remove pages to an existing PDF. You are also able to change the order of the pages.

Resources

  • https://www.ghostscript.com
  • https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/OCRFeeder
  • https://github.com/pdfarranger/pdfarranger
  • https://docupub.com/pdfcompress/

Java Enterprise in briefly detail

If you plan to get in touch with Java Enterprise, may in the beginning it’s a bit overwhelmed and confusing. But don’t worry It’s not so worst like it seems. To start with it, you just need to know some basics about the ideas and concepts.

As first Java EE is not a tool nor a compiler you download and use it in the same manner like Java Development Kit (JDK) also known as Software Development Kit (SDK). Java Enterprise is a set of specifications. Those specifications are supported by an API and the API have a reference implementation. The reference implementation is a bundle you can download and it’s called Application Server.

Since Java EE 8 the Eclipse Foundation maintain Java Enterprise. Oracle and the Eclipse Foundation was not able to find a common agreement for the usage of the Java Trademark, which is owned by Oracle. The short version of this story is that the Eclipse Foundation renamed JavaEE to JakartaEE. This has also an impact to old projects, because the package paths was also changed in Jakarta EE 9 from javax to jakarta. Jakarta EE 9.1 upgrade all components from JDK 8 to JDK 11.

If you want to start with developing Jakarta Enterprise [1] applications you need some prerequisites. As first you have to choose the right version of the JDK. The JDK already contains the runtime environment Java Vitual Machine (JVM) in the same version like the JDK. You don’t need to install the JVM separately. A good choice for a proper JDK is always the latest LTS Version. Java 17 JDK got released 2021 and have support for 3 years until 2024. Here you can find some information about the Java release cycle.

If you wish to overcome the Oracle license restrictions you may could switch to an free Open Source implementation of the JDK. One of the most famous free available variant of the JDK is the OpenJDK from adoptium [2]. Another interesting implementation is GraalVM [3] which is build on top of the OpenJDK. The enterprise edition of GraalVM can speed up your application 1.3 times. For production system a commercial license of the enterprise edition is necessary. GraalVM includes also an own Compiler.

  Version   Year   JSR   Servlet   Tomcat   JavaSE
J2EE – 1.2 1999
J2EE – 1.3 2001 JSR 58
J2EE – 1.4 2003 JSR 151
Java EE 5 2006 JSR 244
Java EE 6 2009 JSR 316
Java EE 7 2013 JSR 342
Java EE 8 2017 JSR 366
Jakarta 8 2019 4.0 9.0 8
Jakarta 9 2020 5.0 10.0 8 & 11
Jakarta 9.1 2021 5.0 10.0 11

The table above is not complete but the most important current versions are listed. Feel free to send me an message if you have some additional information are missing in this overview.

Dependencies (Maven):

<dependency>
    <groupId>jakarta.platform</groupId>
    <artifactId>jakarta.jakartaee-api</artifactId>
    <version>${version}</version>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.eclipse.microprofile</groupId>
    <artifactId>microprofile</artifactId>
    <version>${version}</version>
    <type>pom</type>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

In the next step you have to choose the Jakarta EE environment implementation. This means decide for an application server. It’s very important that the application server you choose can operate on the JVM version you had installed on your system. The reason is quite simple, because the application server is implemented in Java. If you plan to develop a Servlet project, it’s not necessary to operate a full application server, a simple Servlet Container like Apache Tomcat (Catalina) or Jetty contains everything is required.

Jakarta Enterprise reference implementations are: Payara (fork of Glassfish), WildFly (formerly known as JBoss), Apache Geronimo, Apache TomEE, Apache Tomcat, Jetty and so on.

May you heard about Microprofile [4]. Don’t get confused about it, it’s not that difficult like it seems in the beginnin. In general you can understand Microprofiles as a subset of JakartaEE to run Micro Services. Microprofiles got extended by some technologies to trace, observe and monitor the status of the service. Version 5 was released on December 2021 and is full compatible to JakartaEE 9.


Core Technologies

Plain Old Java Beans

POJOs are simplified Java Objects without any business logic. This type of Java Beans only contains attributes and its corresponding getters and setters. POJOs do not:

  • Extend pre-specified classes: e. g. public class Test extends javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet is not considered to be a POJO class.
  • Contain pre-specified annotations: e. g. @javax.persistence.Entity public class Test is not a POJO class.
  • Implement pre-specified interfaces: e. g. public class Test implements javax.ejb.EntityBean is not considered to be a POJO class.

(Jakarta) Enterprise Java Beans

An EJB component, or enterprise bean, is a body of code that has fields and methods to implement modules of business logic. You can think of an enterprise bean as a building block that can be used alone or with other enterprise beans to execute business logic on the Java EE server.

Enterprise beans are either (stateless or stateful) session beans or message-driven beans. Stateless means, when the client finishes executing, the session bean and its data are gone. A message-driven bean combines features of a session bean and a message listener, allowing a business component to receive (JMS) messages asynchronously.

(Jakarta) Java Servlet

Java Servlet technology lets you define HTTP-specific Servlet classes. A Servlet class extends the capabilities of servers that host applications accessed by way of a request-response programming model. Although Servlets can respond to any type of request, they are commonly used to extend the applications hosted by web servers.

(Jakarta) Java Server Pages

JSP is a UI technology and lets you put snippets of Servlet code directly into a text-based document. JSP files transformed by the compiler to a Java Servlet.

(Jakarta) Java Server Pages Standard Tag Library

The JSTL encapsulates core functionality common to many JSP applications. Instead of mixing tags from numerous vendors in your JSP applications, you use a single, standard set of tags. JSTL has iterator and conditional tags for handling flow control, tags for manipulating XML documents, internationalization tags, tags for accessing databases using SQL, and tags for commonly used functions.

(Jakarta) Java Server Faces

JSF technology is a user interface framework for building web applications. JSF was introduced to solve the problem of JSP, where program logic and layout was extremely mixed up.

(Jakarta) Managed Beans

Managed Beans, lightweight container-managed objects (POJOs) with minimal requirements, support a small set of basic services, such as resource injection, lifecycle callbacks, and interceptors. Managed Beans represent a generalization of the managed beans specified by Java Server Faces technology and can be used anywhere in a Java EE application, not just in web modules.

(Jakarta) Java Persistence API

The JPA is a Java standards–based solution for persistence. Persistence uses an object/relational mapping approach to bridge the gap between an object-oriented model and a relational database. The Java Persistence API can also be used in Java SE applications outside of the Java EE environment. Hibernate and Eclipse Link are some reference Implementation for JPA.

(Jakarta) Java Transaction API

The JTA provides a standard interface for demarcating transactions. The Java EE architecture provides a default auto commit to handle transaction commits and rollbacks. An auto commit means that any other applications that are viewing data will see the updated data after each database read or write operation. However, if your application performs two separate database access operations that depend on each other, you will want to use the JTA API to demarcate where the entire transaction, including both operations, begins, rolls back, and commits.

(Jakarta) Java API for RESTful Web Services

The JAX-RS defines APIs for the development of web services built according to the Representational State Transfer (REST) architectural style. A JAX-RS application is a web application that consists of classes packaged as a servlet in a WAR file along with required libraries.

(Jakarta) Dependency Injection for Java

Dependency Injection for Java defines a standard set of annotations (and one interface) for use on injectable classes like Google Guice or the Sprig Framework. In the Java EE platform, CDI provides support for Dependency Injection. Specifically, you can use injection points only in a CDI-enabled application.

(Jakarta) Contexts & Dependency Injection for Java EE

CDI defines a set of contextual services, provided by Java EE containers, that make it easy for developers to use enterprise beans along with Java Server Faces technology in web applications. Designed for use with stateful objects, CDI also has many broader uses, allowing developers a great deal of flexibility to integrate different kinds of components in a loosely coupled but typesafe way.

(Jakarta) Bean Validation

The Bean Validation specification defines a metadata model and API for validating data in Java Beans components. Instead of distributing validation of data over several layers, such as the browser and the server side, you can define the validation constraints in one place and share them across the different layers.

(Jakarta) Java Message Service API

JMS API is a messaging standard that allows Java EE application components to create, send, receive, and read messages. It enables distributed communication that is loosely coupled, reliable, and asynchronous.

(Jakarta) Java EE Connector Architecture

The Java EE Connector Architecture is used by tools vendors and system integrators to create resource adapters that support access to enterprise information systems that can be plugged in to any Java EE product. A resource adapter is a software component that allows Java EE application components to access and interact with the underlying resource manager of the EIS. Because a resource adapter is specific to its resource manager, a different resource adapter typically exists for each type of database or enterprise information system.

The Java EE Connector Architecture also provides a performance-oriented, secure, scalable, and message-based transactional integration of Java EE platform–based web services with existing EISs that can be either synchronous or asynchronous. Existing applications and EISs integrated through the Java EE Connector Architecture into the Java EE platform can be exposed as XML-based web services by using JAX-WS and Java EE component models. Thus JAX-WS and the Java EE Connector Architecture are complementary technologies for enterprise application integration (EAI) and end-to-end business integration.

(Jakarta) JavaMail API

Java EE applications use the JavaMail API to send email notifications. The JavaMail API has two parts:

  • An application-level interface used by the application components to send mail
  • A service provider interface

The Java EE platform includes the JavaMail API with a service provider that allows application components to send Internet mail.

(Jakarta) Java Authorization Contract for Containers

The JACC specification defines a contract between a Java EE application server and an authorization policy provider. All Java EE containers support this contract. The JACC specification defines java.security.Permission classes that satisfy the Java EE authorization model. The specification defines the binding of container-access decisions to operations on instances of these permission classes. It defines the semantics of policy providers that use the new permission classes to address the authorization requirements of the Java EE platform, including the definition and use of roles.

(Jakarta) Java Authentication Service Provider Interface for Containers

The JASPIC specification defines a service provider interface (SPI) by which authentication providers that implement message authentication mechanisms may be integrated in client or server message-processing containers or runtimes. Authentication providers integrated through this interface operate on network messages provided to them by their calling containers. The authentication providers transform outgoing messages so that the source of each message can be authenticated by the receiving container, and the recipient of the message can be authenticated by the message sender. Authentication providers authenticate each incoming message and return to their calling containers the identity established as a result of the message authentication.

(Jakarta) Java EE Security API

The purpose of the Java EE Security API specification is to modernize and simplify the security APIs by simultaneously establishing common approaches and mechanisms and removing the more complex APIs from the developer view where possible. Java EE Security introduces the following APIs:

  • SecurityContext interface: Provides a common, uniform access point that enables an application to test aspects of caller data and grant or deny access to resources.
  • HttpAuthenticationMechanism interface: Authenticates callers of a web application, and is specified only for use in the servlet container.
  • IdentityStore interface: Provides an abstraction of an identity store and that can be used to authenticate users and retrieve caller groups.

(Jakarta) Java API for WebSocket

WebSocket is an application protocol that provides full-duplex communications between two peers over TCP. The Java API for WebSocket enables Java EE applications to create endpoints using annotations that specify the configuration parameters of the endpoint and designate its lifecycle callback methods.

(Jakarta) Java API for JSON Processing

The JSON-P enables Java EE applications to parse, transform, and query JSON data using the object model or the streaming model.

JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a text-based data exchange format derived from JavaScript that is used in web services and other connected applications.

(Jakarta) Java API for JSON Binding

The JSON-B provides a binding layer for converting Java objects to and from JSON messages. JSON-B also supports the ability to customize the default mapping process used in this binding layer through the use of Java annotations for a given field, JavaBean property, type or package, or by providing an implementation of a property naming strategy. JSON-B is introduced in the Java EE 8 platform.

(Jakarta) Concurrency Utilities for Java EE

Concurrency Utilities for Java EE is a standard API for providing asynchronous capabilities to Java EE application components through the following types of objects: managed executor service, managed scheduled executor service, managed thread factory, and context service.

(Jakarta) Batch Applications for the Java Platform

Batch jobs are tasks that can be executed without user interaction. The Batch Applications for the Java Platform specification is a batch framework that provides support for creating and running batch jobs in Java applications. The batch framework consists of a batch runtime, a job specification language based on XML, a Java API to interact with the batch runtime, and a Java API to implement batch artifacts.

Resources

[1] https://jakarta.ee
[2] https://adoptopenjdk.net
[3] https://www.graalvm.org
[4] https://microprofile.io

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